Once upon a time there lived an old man and woman who had a granddaughter named Masha. One day some friends of Masha’s decided to go to the forest to gather mushrooms and berries and they came to Masha’s house to ask her to go with them.

«Please, Grannie and Grampa,» said Masha, «do let me go to the forest»

«You may go but see that you keep close to the others and do not lose sight of them or you might get lost», the two old people replied.

Masha and her friends came to the forest and began to hunt for the mushrooms and berries. From bush to bush, from tree to tree went Masha. Before she knew it she had strayed away from her friends. When at last she saw that she was all alone she began to halloo and call to them, but her friends did not hear her and made no answer. Masha went here and there, she walked all over the forest, and there before her she saw a little hut. Masha knocked on the door but there was no answer, so she gave the door a push and lo! the door opened. Masha went into the hut and sat down on a bench by the window.

«I wonder who lives here she thought». Now in that hut lived a great big bear, only he was out walking in the forest just then. It was evening by the time he came home and when he saw Masha he was very pleased.

«Aha», said he, «now I’ll never let you go!. You will live here in my house as meek as a mouse, and you will cook my dinner and my breakfast too, and be my servant, faithful and true.»

Masha grieved and sorrowed for a long time, but it could not be helped, and so she stayed with the bear and kept house for him. Every day the bear would go into the forest for the day and before leaving, he would tell Masha to stay in the hut and wait for him.

«You must never go out without me, he told her, for if you do I will catch you and eat you up.»

So Masha sat thing of how she could get away from the bear. All around was the forest and there was no one to ask which way to go. She thought and thought until she knew what to do.

That day, when the bear came back from the forest, Masha said to him:

» Bear, Bear do let me to to my village for a day. I want to take something good to eat for my Grandma and Grandpa.»

«No that wont do at all» said the bear, «you will get lost in the forest, but if you give me what it is you want to give your Grandma and Grandpa, I will take it myself».

Now that was all that Masha wanted to hear. She baked some pies, put them on a plate, and getting out a very large basket, said to the bear:

«I’ll put the pies in the basket and you can take them to my Grandma and Grandpa. But mind you are not to open the basket on the way and you are not to eat any of the pies. I am going to climb to the top of the big oak tree and watch that you do not open the basket.»

«Very well «, said the bear, «Give me the basket».

The bear went out on the porch to make sure that it was not raining. When he did, Masha crawled into the basket and covered herself with the pies. The bear came in, and there was the basket all ready to go. So he strapped the basket on his back and started off. Tramp-tramp went the bear amid the spruce trees. Clumpity-clumphe went amid the birch trees, up hill and down dale went his long winding trail, and on and on he walked. At last he got tired and sat down to rest.

«If I don’t rest my bones I think I will die, So I will sit on a stump And I’ll eat a pie», said the Bear.

But Masha called out from the basket:

«I see you, I see you Don’t sit on the stump And don’t eat my pie But take it to Grandma And Grandpa, say I».

«Dear me what sharp eyes eyes Masha has», said the bear, «she sees everything».

He picked up the basket and went on. He stopped again and said:

«If I don’t rest my bones, I think I will dies, so I’ll sit on a stump and eat a pie».

But Masha called out again from the basket:

«I see you, I see you! Don’t sit on the stump, and don’t eat my pie, but take it to Grandma and Grandpa, say I».

«What a clever little girls Masha is», said the bear. «She is sitting high up in a tree and she is far away, but she sees all I do and she hears all I say».

He got to his feet and walked on and on even faster than before. He came to the village and finding the house where Masha’s grandfather and grandmother lived he began to bang away on the gate with all his might.

» KNOCK, KNOCK, open the gate», he cried, «I have brought something for you from Masha, he cried».

But the village dogs scented the bear and rushed out at him from every yard, yelping and barking. The bear was frightened, he set down the basket by the gate and away he ran as fast as he could without looking back.

The old man and woman came up to the gate and saw the basket.

«What is in the basket», the old woman asked.

The old man lifted the top, and looked and he could not believe his eyes. For there in the basket sat Masha alive and well. The old man and woman were overjoyed. They kissed and hugged and embraced. Masha and they said she was as clever as clever can be, as indeed all our readers will surely agree.[/spoiler] [spoiler title=’Crimson Flower (Аленький цветочек)’ style=’default’ collapse_link=’true’]

Once upon a time in a far away land a merchant was preparing to set out on a long journey. This merchant had three daughters, and he asked all of them what they would like as gifts for themselves when he returned from his voyage. The first daughter requested a golden crown, and the second one wanted a crystal mirror. The third daughter asked only for «the little scarlet flower.

The merchant set out on his journey. It did not take him very long to find a beautiful golden crown and a fine crystal mirror. He had difficulty however, finding the third gift, the scarlet flower. He searched everywhere, and eventually his search led him into a magical forest. Deep within these woods there was situated a palace, in whose courtyard grew a beautiful flower. As the merchant drew closer to the flower he realized what it was, the scarlet flower. Cautiously, the merchant picked the flower that his youngest daughter wanted so badly. Upon picking the scarlet flower he was confronted by a hideous beast, who demanded that in return for picking the flower the merchant must send one of his daughters deep into the enchanted forest, to live with the beast forever.

Upon recieving the scarlet flower, the merchant’s youngest daughter agreed to go to the beast. She journeyed alone into the forest and found the castle where she would dwell forever. For a time, she lived there very happily. The beast had not revealed himself to her, and showered her daily with kindness and gifts. She started to grow quite fond of her invisible keeper, and one day asked that he show himself. The beast reluctantly gave into her plea, and just as he had feared, she recoiled in terror at the site of him.»

That night the girl had a haughnting dream about her father falling deathly ill. She begged the beast to release her, so that she could find her dying father. Touched by her concern, the beast released her on one condition — that she return to him in three days time. The girl found her father, and prepared to return to the beast in the alloted time. However, her sisters altered the time on the clocks, making her arrive late. There upon her arrival the girl was horrified at what she encountered. The beast was dead, lying there clutching her scarlet flower. Heartbroken, the girl embraced the dead beast, and declared her love for him. Having done this, she unknowingly broke the evil spell, and her beloved beast awoke, turning into a handsome prince.

They lived happily ever after[/spoiler] [spoiler title=’Emelya and the Pike (Емеля)’ style=’default’ collapse_link=’true’]

Once upon a time there lived an old man who had three sons, two of them clever young men and the third, Emelya, a fool. The two elder brothers were always at work, while Emelya lay on the stove ledge all day long with not a care in the world.

One day the two brothers rode away to market, and their wives said:

Go and fetch some water, Emelya.

And Emelya, lying on the stove ledge, replied:

Not I. I dont want to.

Go, Emelya, or your brothers will bring no presents for you from the market.

Oh, all right then.

Down climbed Emelya from the stove, put on his boots and caftan and, taking along two pails and an axe, went to the river.

He cut a hole in the ice with his axe, scooped up two pailfuls of water, put down the pails and himself bent down to look into the ice-hole. He looked and he looked and what did he see but a Pike swimming in the water. Out shot his arm, and there was the Pike in his hands.

WeH have some fine pike soup for dinner today! he exclaimed, delighted.

But the Pike suddenly spoke up in a human voice and said:

Let me go, Emelya, and Ill do you a good turn, too, some day Emelya only laughed.

What good turn could you do me No, I think Ill take you home and tell my sisters-in-law to make some soup. I do so love pike soup.

But the Pike fell to begging him again and said:

Do let me go, Emelya, and Ill do anything you wish.

All right, Emelya replied, only first you must prove you arent trying to fool me.

Said the Pike: Tell me what you want, Emelya.

I want my pails to go home all by themselves without spilling a drop of water.

Very well, Emelya, the Pike said. Whenever you wish something, you have only to say:

By will of the Pike, do as I like, and it will all be done at once.

And Emelya, nothing loath, said: By will of the Pike, do as I like! Off you go home, pails, by yourselves!

O nce upon a time there lived an old man who had three sons, two of them clever young men and the third, Emelya, a fool. The two elder brothers were always at work, while Emelya lay on the stove ledge all day long with not a care in the world.One day the two brothers rode away to market, and their wives said:

Go and fetch some water, Emelya.

And Emelya, lying on the stove ledge, replied:

Not 1. I dont want to.

Go, Emelya, or your brothers will bring no presents for you from the market.

Oh, all right then.

Down climbed Emelya from the stove, put on his boots and caftan and, taking along two pails and an axe, went to the river.

He cut a hole in the ice with his axe, scooped up two pailfuls of water, put down the pails and himself bent down to look into the ice-hole. He looked and he looked and what did he see but a Pike swimming in the water. Out shot his arm, and there was the Pike in his hands.

WeH have some fine pike soup for dinner today! he exclaimed, delighted.

But the Pike suddenly spoke up in a human voice and said:

Let me go, Emelya, and Ill do you a good turn, too, some day

Emelya only laughed.

What good turn could you do me No, I think Ill take you home and tell my sisters-in-law to make some soup. I do so love pike soup.

But the Pike fell to begging him again and said:

«Do let me go, Emelya, and Ill do anything you wish.

All right, Emelya replied, only first you must prove you arent trying to fool me.

Said the Pike: Tell me what you want, Emelya.

I want my pails to go home all by themselves without spilling adrop of water.

Very well, Emelya, the Pike said. Whenever you wish some-thing, you have only to say:

By will of the Pike, do as I like, and it will all be done at once.

And Emelya, nothing loath, said:

By will of the Pike, do as I like! Off you go home, pails, by yourselves!

And, lo and behold! the pails turned and marched up the hill. Emelya put the Pike back into the ice-hole and himself walked after his pails.

On went the pails along the village street, and the villagers stood round and marvelled while Emelya followed the pails, chuckling. The pails marched straight into Emelyas hut and jumped up on the bench, and Emelya climbed up on to the stove ledge again.

A long time passed by and a little time, and his sisters-in-law said to Emelya:

Why are you lying there, Emelya Go and chop us some wood.

Not I.I dont want to, Emelya said.

If you dont do what we say, your brothers will bring no presents for you from the market.

Emelya. was loath to leave the stove ledge. He remembered the Pike and said under his breath:

By will of the Pike, do as I like! Go and chop some wood, axe, and you, wood, come inside the house and jump into the stove.

And lo! the axe leapt out from under the bench and into the yard and began to chop the wood, and the logs filed into the hut all by themselves and jumped into the stove.

A long time passed by and a little time, and his sister-in-law said to Emelva:

We have no more wood, Emelva. Go to the forest and cut some.

And Emelya, lolling on the stove, replied:

Andwhatareyou herefor

What do you mean by that, Emelya the women said. Surelv its not out business to go to the forest for wood.

But I dont much want to do it, Emelva said.

Well, then you wont get any presents, they told him.

There was no help for it, so Emelya climbed down from the stove and put on his boots and caftan. He took a length of rope and an axe, came out into the yard and, getting into the sledee; cried:

Open the gates, women!

And his sisters-in-law said to him:

What are you doing in the sledge, fool You havent harnessed the horse yet.

I can do without the horse, Emelya replied.

His sisters-in-law opened the gate and Emelya said under his breath:

By will of the Pike; do as I like! Off you go to the forest, sledge And, lo and behold the sledge whizzed out through the gate so quickly that one could scarcely have caught up with it even on horseback.

Now the way to the forest lay through a town. and the sledge knocked down many people. The townsfolk cried: Hold him! Catch him But Emelya paid no heed and only urged the sledge on to go the faster.

He came to the forest, stopped the sledge and said:

By will of the Pike, do as I hke! Cut some dry wood, axe, and you. faggots, climb into the sledge and bind yourselves together.

And, lo and behold ! the axe began to hack and split the dry wood, and the faggots dropped into the sledge one by one and bound themselves together. Emelya then ordered the axe to cut him a cudgel, so heavy that one could scarcely lift it. He got up on top of his load and said:

By will of the Pike, do as I like! Off you go home, sledge!

And the sledge drove off very fast indeed. Emelya again passed through the town where he had knocked down so many people, and there they were all ready and waiting for him. They seized him, pulled him out of the sledge and began to curse and to beat him.

Seeing that he was in a bad plight, Emelya said under his breath:

By will of the Pike, do as I like! Come, cudgel, give them a good thrashing!

And the cudgel sprang up and laid to, right and left. The townsfolk took to their heels and Emelya went home and climbed up on the stove again.

A long time passed by and a little time, and the Tsar heard of Emelyas doings and sent one of his officers to find him and bring him to the palace.

The officer came to Emelyas village, entered his hut and asked him:

Are you Emelya the Fool?

And Emelya replied from the stove ledge:

What if I am?

Dress quickly and I shall take you to the Tsars palace.

Oh, no. I dont want to go, Emelya said.

The officer flew into a temper and struck Emelya in the face. And Emelya said under his breath:

By will of the Pike, do as I like! Come, cudgel, give him a good thrashing.

And out the cudgel jumped and beat the officer so that it was all he could do to drag himself back to the palace.

The Tsar was much surprised to learn that his officer had not been able to get the better ofEmelya and he sent for the greatest of his nobles.

Find Emelya and bring him to my palace or Ill have your head chopped off, he said.

The great noble bought a store of raisins and prunes and honey cakes, and then he came to the selfsame village and into the selfsame hut and he asked Emelyas sisters-in-law what it was Emelya liked best.

Emelya likes to be spoken to kindly, they said. He will do anything you want if only you are gentle with him and promise him a red caftan for a present.

The great noble then gave Emelya the raisins, prunes and honey cakes he had brought, and said:

Please, Emelya, why do you lie on the stove ledge Come with me to the Tsars palace.

Im well enough where I am, Emelya replied.

Ah, Emelya, the Tsar will feast you on sweetmeats and wines. Do let us go to the palace.

Not I. I dont want to, Emelya replied.

But, Emelya, the Tsar will give you a fine red caftan for a present and a pair of boots.

Emelya thought for a while and then he said:

Very well, then, I shall come. Only you must go on alone and I shall by follow by and by.

The noble rode away and Emelya lay on the stove a while longer said:

By will of the Pike, do as I like! Off you go to the Tsars palace, stove!

And lo! the corners of the hut began to crack, the roof swayed, a wall crashed down and the stove whipped off all by itself into the street and down the road and made straight for the Tsars palace.

The Tsar looked out of the window and marvelled.

What is that he asked.

And the great noble replied:

That is Emelya riding on his stove to your palace.

The Tsar stepped out on his porch and said:

I have had many complaints about you, Emelya. It seems you have knocked down many people.

Why did they get in the way of my sledge said Emelya.

Now, the Tsars daughter Tsarevna Marya was loolong out of the palace window just then, and when Emelya saw her, he said under his breath:

By will of the Pike, do as I like! Let the Tsars daughter fall in love with me.

And he added:

Go home, stove!

The stove turned and made straight for Emelyas village. It whisked into the hut and went back to its place, and Emelya lay on fhe stove ledge as before.

Meanwhile, there were tears and wails in the palace. Tsarevna Marya was crying her eyes out for Emelya. She told her father she could not live without him and begged him to let her marry Emelya. The Tsar was much troubled and grieved and he said to the great noble:

Go and bring Emelya here, dead or alive. Do not fail, or Ill have your head chopped off.

The great noble bought many kinds of dainties and sweet wines and set off for Emelyas village again. He entered the selfsame hut and he began to feast Emelya royally.

Emelya had his fill of the good food and the wine, and his head swimming, lay down and fell asleep. And the noble put the sleeping Emelya into his carriage and rode off with him to the Tsars palace.

The Tsar at once ordered a large barrel bound with iron hoops to be brought in. Emelya and Tsarevna Marya were placed into it and the barrel was tarred and cast into the sea.

A long time passed by and a little time, and Emelya awoke. Finding himself in darkness and closely confined, he said:

Where am I?

And Tsarevna Marya replied:

Sad and dreary is our lot, Emelya my love! They have put us in a tarred barrel and cast us into the blue sea.

And who are you Emelya asked.

I am Tsarevna Marya.

Said Emelya:

By will of the Pike, do as I like! Come, o wild winds, cast the barrel on to the dry shore and let it rest on the yellow sand!

And, lo and behold! the wild winds began to blow, the sea became troubled and the barrel was cast on to the dry shore and it came to rest on the yellow sand. Out stepped Emelya and Tsarevna Marya, and Tsarevna Marya said:

Where are we going to live, Emelya my love Do build us a hut of some kind.

Not I. I dont want to, Emelya replied.

But she begged and begged and at last he said:

By will of the Pike, do as I like! Let a palace of stone with a roof of gold be built!

And no sooner were the words out of his mouth than a stone palace with a roof of gold rose up before them. Round it there spread a green garden, where flowers bloomed and birds sang. Tsarevna Marya and Emelya came into the palace and sat down by the window. Said Tsarevna Marya:

Oh, Emelya, couldnt you become a little more handsome?

And-Emelya did not think long before he said:

By will of the Pike, do as I like! Change me into a tall and handsome man.

And lo! Emelya turned into a youth as fair as the sky at dawn, the handsomest youth that ever was born.

Now about that time the Tsar went hunting and he saw a palace where one had never been seen before.

What dolt has dared to build a palace on my ground he asked, and he sent hig messengers to learn who the culprit was.

The Tsars messengers ran to the palace, stood under the window and called to Emelya, asking him to tell them who he was.

Tell the Tsar to come and visit me, and he shall hear from my lips who I am, Emelya replied.

The Tsar did as Emelya bade, and Emelya met him at the palace gate, led him into the palace, seated him at his table and feasted him royally. The Tsar ate and drank and marvelled.

Who are you, my good fellow he asked at last.

Do you remember Emelya the Fool who came to visit you on top of a stove Emelya said. Do you remember how you had him put in a tarred barrel together with your daughter Tsarevna Marya and cast into the sea Well, I am that same Emelya. If I choose, I can set fire to your whole tsardom and level it with the ground.

The Tsar was very frightened and he begged Emelya to forgive him.

You can have my daughter in marriage and you can have my tsardom, too, only spare me, Emelya, said he.

Then such a grand feast was held as the world had never seen. Emelya married Tsarevna Marya and began to rule the realm and they both lived happily ever after.

And that is my faithful tales end, while he who listened is my own true friend[/spoiler] [spoiler title=’Fox, Hare and Rooster (Лиса, заяц и петух)’ style=’default’ collapse_link=’true’]

There was once a fox and a hare. The fox had a house of ice, the hare a house of wood. Fair spring came and melted the fox’s house, while the hare’s stood firm and strong. So the fox asked the hare if she could come in to warm herself, then drove him out. The hare went down the road crying, and met two dogs, who asked, «Wuff, wuff, wuff! Why are you crying?» «Leave me alone, dogs! Who wouldn’t cry? I had a wooden house, while the fox had one of ice. She invited herself into mine and drove me out.» «Don’t cry, hare,» barked the dogs. «We’ll chase her out.» «No, you won’t.» «Oh, yes we will.» Off they went to the hare’s house. «Wuff, wuff, wuff! Come out of there, fox!» «Go away, before I come and tear you to pieces,» she shouted back from the stove. The dogs took fright and fled.

Once more the hare went on his way crying. This time he met a bear who asked, «Why are you crying?» «Leave me alone, bear,» said the hare. «Who wouldn’t cry? I had a wooden house, while the fox had one of ice. She invited herself into mine and drove me out.» «Don’t cry, hare,» said the bear. «I’ll chase her out.» «No, you won’t. The dogs tried and failed; you’ll fare no better.» «Oh, yes I will.» Off they went to chase her out. «Come on out, fox!» roared the bear. But she shouted from the stove: «Go away, before I come and tear you to pieces.» The bear took fright and fled.

Once more the hare went on his way crying and met an ox who asked, «Why are you crying?» «Leave me alone, ox! Who wouldn’t cry? I had a wooden house,

while the fox had one of ice. She invited herself into mine and drove me out.» «Come with me, I’ll chase her out.» «No, you won’t,» said the hare. «The dogs tried and failed, the bear tried and failed; you’ll fare no better.» «Oh, yes I will.» Off they went together to the hare’s house. «Come on out, fox!» But she shouted from the stove: «Go away, before I come and tear you to pieces.» The ox took fright and fled.

Once more the hare went on his way crying and met a cock with a scythe. «Cock-a-doodle-doo! Why are you crying, hare?» «Leave me alone, cock! Who wouldn’t cry? I had a house of wood, while the fox had one of ice. She invited herself into mine and drove me out.» «Come along with me, I’ll chase her out.» «No, you won’t,» said the hare. «The dogs tried and failed; the bear tried and failed;

the ox tried and failed. You’ll fare no better.» «Oh, yes I-will.» So they went up to the house. «Cock-a-doodle-doo! I’ll cut that fox in two with my scythe so sharp and true!» When the fox heard that, she took fright and called, «I’m getting dressed.» Again the cock crowed: «Cock-a-doodle-doo! I’ll cut that fox in two with my scythe so sharp and true!» And the fox cried: «I’m putting on my fur coat.» A third time the cock crowed: «Cock-a-doodle-doo! I’ll cut that fox in two with my scythe so sharp and true!» The fox rushed out of the door and the cock cut off her head. So the hare and the cock lived together happily ever after[/spoiler] [spoiler title=’Ivan Tsarevitch and the Grey Wolf (Иван царевич и серый волк)’ style=’default’ collapse_link=’true’]

Once upon a time there lived a Tsar who had three sons. The youngest was called Ivan. The Tsar had a wonderous garden. In it grew a tree with golden apples. Someone began coming to the Tsar’s garden to steal the apples. The Tsar became upset about it. He sent some guards there.

None of the guards were able to track the culprit. The Tsar stopped eating and drinking, he became listless. His sons tried to comfort him: «Dear Father, don’t grieve, we ourselves will guard the garden.» The oldest son said: «Today is my turn, I will go to watch over the garden.» The oldest son set out for the garden.

A little while before evening, there wasn’t a trace of anyone, and he lay down on the soft grass and fell asleep. In the morning the Tsar asked him: «Well, enlighten me, did you see the culprit?» «No, Father, all night I didn’t sleep, my eyes never closed, but I didn’t see anything.»

On the next night the middle son went to stand guard and also slept the whole night, but in the morning said that he hadn’t seen the culprit. At last it was time for the youngest son to stand watch. Ivan went to guard his father’s garden, and even though he was sitting there afraid, he didn’t lie down. When he started to dream, he took dew from the grass and wiped the dream from his eyes.

Midnight came, and to him it appeared there was light in the garden. It got brighter and brighter. All the garden was lit up. He saw the Firebird sitting in the apple tree, pecking at the golden apples. Ivan Tsarevich crawled toward the apple tree and grabbed the bird by the tail. The Firebird flapped it’s wings and flew away, leaving in Ivan’s hand, one feather.

In the morning Ivan Tsarevich went to his father. «Well, my dear Vanya, you didn’t see the culprit either?» «Dear Father, I remember but don’t remember, who destroys our garden. Here is a memento from the culprit for you to take. It is, Dear Father, the Firebird.»

The Tsar took the feather, and from that time began to eat and to drink, and knew no more sorrow. It was a beautiful time to him and he pondered about the Firebird. He called his sons and said to them: «My dear children, saddle would you good steeds, go would you about the wide world, to places unknown, where you might catch the Firebird.

The children bowed to their father, saddled good horses and set out on their way. The oldest in one direction, the middle in another, and Ivan Tsarevich in the third direction. Ivan went a long time, or a short time. The day was summery. Ivan Tsarevich grew tired, got down from his horse, fettered him, and tumbled down to sleep.

A long time or a short time passed, Ivan Tsarevich woke up and saw, no horse. He went to look for him, he walked and walked and hoped to find his horse nibbling on a bush. Thought Ivan Tsarevich: where without a horse to go in such remoteness? «Well, what of it, he thought, set out, nothing else to do.» And he went on foot. He walked and walked, grew tired to death. Sat on the soft grass and grew more sad. From out of nowhere ran toward him the Grey Wolf. «What, Ivan Tsarevich, sitting there grieving, your head hanging?» «How can I not grieve, Grey Wolf?» I am left alone without a good steed.» «It is I, Ivan Tsarevich, who ate your horse…I’m sorry! Tell me, why are you traveling in this remote place, where are you going?» «My father sent us to go about the wide world to find the Firebird.» «Pooh, pooh, you on your own good horse could not in three years go to the Firebird. I alone know where he lives.

So, and it will be, I ate your horse, and I will serve you, it’s only right. Sit on me and hold on tight.» Ivan Tsarevich sat on his back and the Grey Wolf leapt flying through the blue forest faster than the eye could see, past rivers and lakes. For a long time, or a short time, they flew to a high fortress. The Grey Wolf said: «Listen to me, Ivan Tsarevich, and remember: crawl over the wall, don’t be afraid, it’s a lucky hour, all the guards are asleep. You will see in the terem window, on the window sill stands a golden cage, and in the cage sits the Firebird. Take the bird, lay him by your breast, and look but don’t touch the cage!»

Ivan Tsarevich crawled over the wall, saw the terem, on the window sill sat the golden cage, and in the cage sat the Firebird. He took the bird, laid him by his breast, and looked at the cage. His heart caught fire: «Ah, such golden decoration! How can I not take it!» And he remembered what the Grey Wolf had said to him. He only touched the cage, throughout the fortress sounds: pipes piped, the guards woke up, grabbed Ivan Tsarevich and carried him to Tsar Afron.

Tsar Afron was enraged and said: «Who are you, where are you from?» «I am the son of Tsar Ferapont. Ivan Tsarevich.» «Ah, what a disgrace! A tsar’s son goes out and steals.» «But what about when your bird flew into our garden and destroyed it?» «But if you had come to me to ask for advice, I would have given him to you, out of respect for your father Tsar Ferapont. But now, about all the city, the most uncomplimentary glory upon you…

Well and all right, render to me a service, I ask you. In some-such principality Tsar Kusman has a horse with a golden mane. Bring him to me, then I will give you the Firebird with the cage. Ivan Tsarevich grew very excited, went to the Grey Wolf. But the wolf said to him: «I told you, don’t disturb the cage! Why didn’t you listen to my instructions?» «Well, I beg you, I beg you, Grey Wolf.» «Well, well, I beg….Alright, sit on me. Take the rope, don’t say that it is not strong.» Again set off the Grey Wolf with Ivan Tsarevich.

For a long time, or a short time, they flew to the other fortress, where stood the horse with the golden mane. «Crawl, Ivan Tsarevich, over the wall, the guards are asleep, go to the stable, take the horse, and look, but don’t touch the bridle.» Ivan Tsarevich crawled into the fortress, all the guards were asleep.

He went to the stables, took the horse with the golden mane, and looked at the bridle. It was gold with precious stones. Ivan Tsarevich touched the bridle, and a loud noise went all through the fortress: pipes piped, the guards awoke, grabbed Ivan and carried him to Tsar Kusman. «Who are you, where are you from?» «I am Ivan Tsarevich.» «Eeh, such stupidity to undertake, to steal a horse! On this even a simple peasant would agree.» «Well, all right, I beg you, Ivan Tsarevich, render me a service.

Tsar Dalmat has a daughter, Elena Prekracnaya. (the beautiful) Go and get her, bring her to me, and I will give you the horse with the golden mane and his bridle.» Ivan Tsarevich became more dejected than ever, he went toward the Grey Wolf. «I told you, Ivan Tsarevich: Don’t touch the bridle! You didn’t listen to my advice.» «Well, I beg you, I beg you, Grey Wolf».

«Well well, you beg…yes, all right, sit on my back.» Again sped off the grey wolf with Ivan Tsarevich. They rushed to Tsar Dalmat. He had a garden in his fortress where Elena Prekrasnaya walked with her mother and her nurse. Grey Wolf said: «This time I myself will go. You go back the way we came. I will soon catch up with you.» Ivan Tsarevich went back the way they had come, and the Grey Wolf jumped over the wall and into the garden. He sat in hiding behind a bush and watched.

Elena Prekrasnaya came out with her mother and nurse. They walked and walked and her mother and nurse stopped for a bit. Grey Wolf grabbed Elena Prekrasnaya, leapt over the wall, and took flight. Ivan Tsarevich was going along the way, when suddenly the Grey Wolf caught up with him. On the wolf sat Elena Prekrasnaya. Ivan Tsarevich rejoiced, but the Grey Wolf said to him: «Sit on me quickly, for they will not be far behind.» The Grey Wolf sped away with Ivan Tsarevich and Elena Prekrasnaya the way they had come, through the blue forest, faster than the eye could see, past rivers and lakes. For a long time, or for a short time, they hurried to Tsar Kusman.

The Grey Wolf asked: «Why, Ivan Tsarevich have you become even more sad?» «But, how can I not be sad, Grey Wolf? How can I be parted with such beauty? How can I exchange Elena Prekrasnaya for a horse?» The Grey Wolf answered: «I won’t part you with such beauty, we will hide her somewhere, I will turn myself into Elena Prekrasnaya, and you will bring me to the Tsar.» They hid Elena Prekrasnaya in a forest isba.

The Grey Wolf turned his head and became exactly like Elena Prekrasnaya. Ivan Tsarevich took him to Tsar Kusman. The Tsar rejoiced and began thanking him: «Thankyou, Ivan Tsarevich, for you have brought to me a bride. Take the horse with the golden mane and bridle.» Ivan Tsarevich sat on the horse and went for Elena Prekracnaya.

He picked her up and sat her on the horse and they set out on their way. Tsar Kusman had the wedding, and feasted all day until evening. Then he needed to lie down to sleep. But when he and his young wife went up the stairs, he looked, and in place of Elena Prekrasnaya was a wolf! The tsar turned angrily toward him, but the wolf ran off. The Grey Wolf caught up with Ivan Tsarevich and asked: «Why are you so sad, Ivan Tsarevich?» «How can I not be sad? It would be a pity to part with such a bridle, and to trade the horse with the golden mane for the Firebird.» «Don’t grieve, I will help you.» And they traveled to Tsar Afron.

The wolf said: «Hide the horse and Elena Prekrasnaya. I will turn myself into the horse with the golden mane, and you will bring me to Tsar Afron.» They hid Elena Prekrasnaya and the horse with the golden mane in the forest. The Grey Wolf looked over his back and turned himself into the horse with the golden mane. Ivan Tsarevich took him to Tsar Afron.

The tsar was overjoyed and gave him the Firebird with the golden cage. Ivan Tsarevich returned on foot to the forest, sat Elena Prekrasnaya on the horse with the golden mane picked up the golden cage with the Firebird, and they traveled in the direction of his homeland. Tsar Afron commanded his servants to bring his horse to him. He wanted to sit on him, but the horse turned into the Grey Wolf.

The tsar was so surprised that he fell down right where he was standing, and the Grey Wolf took flight, quickly catching up with Ivan Tsarevich. «Now, farewell, I am not allowed to go any further.» Ivan Tsarevich got down from his horse, and three times bowed down to the ground, with respect he thanked the Grey Wolf. Then he said: «You won’t be parted with me forever, I again will call you into service.» Ivan Tsarevich thought: «Aren’t you already in my service, all of my wishes you have fufilled.»

He sat on the horse with the golden mane, and again set out with Elena Prekrasnaya and the Firebird. They traveled into his region. They had only a little bread left. They traveled to a little spring and drank the water, and ate the bread, and lay down on the grass to rest. Ivan Tsarevich fell asleep. His brothers suddenly came upon him. They had traveled to other lands, seeking the firebird, and returned empty-handed. They came upon Ivan and saw all that he had acquired.

Then they said: «Let us kill our brother, all that he has gained will be ours.» This decided, they killed Ivan Tsarevich. They saddled the horse with the golden mane, picked up the Firebird, sat Elena Prekrasnaya on the horse, and threatened her: «At home, don’t say anything>» Ivan Tsarevich lay dead, two crows were already flying over him. From out of no where ran the Grey Wolf, and grabbed the crow and his wife. «You fly, crow, for the water of life and death.

Bring to me the water of life and the water of death, and then I will let go of your wife. The crow flew for a long time or a short time, bringing the water of life and the water of death. The Grey Wolf sprinkled the water of death on Ivan’s wounds, the wounds healed.

He sprinkled him with the water of life, and Ivan got up. ?Oh, how soundly I slept!? ?You would have slept even sounder?, said the Grey Wolf, ?if I hadn?t sprinkled you with the water of life and the water of death! Your own brothers killed you and took all that you have gained. Even now one of your brothers is to marry Elena Prekrasnaya. Sit on me quickly!?

They rushed home, where, indeed, Ivan?s brother was preparing to marry Elena Prekrasnaya. No sooner had Ivan Tsarevich entered the castle, than Elena Prekrasnaya jumped up and threw her arms around him. ?This is my true bridegroom, Ivan!? she cried, ?Not the evil brother sitting there!? And she told the Tsar everything the brothers had done, and how they had threatened to kill her if she told anyone what had happened.

The Tsar was very angry and threw the two oldest brothers into the dungeon. Then Ivan Tsarevich married Elena Prekrasnaya, and they lived happily ever after. [/spoiler] [spoiler title=’Morozko (Морозко)’ style=’default’ collapse_link=’true’]

Once there lived an old widower and his daughter. In due time, the man remarried to an older woman who had a daughter herself from a previous marriage. The woman doted on her own daughter, praising her at every opportunity, but she despised her stepdaughter

She found fault with everything the girl did and made her work long and hard all day long.
One day the old woman made up her mind to get rid of the stepdaughter once and for all. She ordered her husband:

«Take her somewhere so that my eyes no longer have to see her, so that my ears no longer have to hear her. And don’t take her to some relative’s house. Take her into the biting cold of the forest and leave her there.»

The old man grieved and wept but he knew that he could do nothing else; his wife always had her way. So he took the girl into the forest and left her there. He turned back quickly so that he wouldn’t have to see his girl freeze.

Oh, the poor thing, sitting there in the snow, with her body shivering and her teeth chattering! Then Morozko (the Father Frost), leaping from tree to tree, came upon her. «Are you warm, my lass?» he asked.

«Welcome, my dear Morozko. Yes, I am quite warm,» she said, even though she was cold through and through.

At first, Morozko had wanted to freeze the life out of her with his icy grip. But he admired the young girl’s stoicism and showed mercy. He gave her a warm fur coat and downy quilts before he left. In a short while, Morozko returned to check on the girl.

«Are you warm, my lass?» he asked.

«Welcome again, my dear Morozko. Yes, I am very warm,» she said.

And indeed she was warmer. So this time Morozko brought a large box for her to sit on. A little later, Morozko returned once more to ask how she was doing. She was doing quite well now, and this time Morozko gave her silver and gold jewelry to wear, with enough extra jewels to fill the box on which she was sitting!

Meanwhile, back at her father’s hut, the old woman told her husband to go back into the forest to bring back the body of his daughter. He did as he was ordered. He arrived at the spot where had left her, and was overjoyed when he saw his daughter alive, wrapped in a sable coat and adorned with silver and gold. When he arrived home with his daughter and the box of jewels, his wife looked on in amazement.

«Harness the horse, you old goat, and take my own daughter to that same spot in the forest and leave her there,» she said.

The old man did as he was told. Like the other girl at first, the old woman’s daughter began to shake and shiver. In a short while, Morozko came by and asked her how she was doing.

«Are you blind?» she replied. «Can’t you see that my hands and feet are quite numb? Curse you, you miserable old man!» Dawn had hardly broken the next day when, back at the old man’s hut, the old woman woke her husband and told him to bring back her daughter, adding:

«Be careful with the box of jewels.» The old man obeyed and went to fetch the girl. A short while later, the gate to the yard creaked. The old woman went outside and saw her husband standing next to the sleigh. She rushed forward and pulled aside the sleigh’s cover. To her horror, she saw the body of her daughter, frozen by an angry Morozko. She began to scream and berate her husband, but it was all in vein. Later, the old man’s daughter married a neighbor, had children, and lived happily. Her father would visit his grandchildren every now and then, and remind them always to respect Old Man Winter[/spoiler] [spoiler title=’Princess Frog (Царевна-лягушка)’ style=’default’ collapse_link=’true’]

Long, long ago, in days of yore, there lived a king who had three sons, all of them grown to manhood. One day the king called them to him and said, «My sons. let each of you make a bow for himself and shoot an arrow. The maiden who brings your arrow back will be your bride; and he whose arrow is not returned will stay unwed.» The eldest son shot an arrow and a prince’s daughter brought it back. The middle son loosed an arrow and a general’s daughter brought it back. But young Prince Ivan’s arrow fell into a marsh and was brought back by a frog holding it between her teeth. The first two brothers were joyful and happy, but Prince Ivan was downcast and cried: «How can I live with a frog? Marrying is for a lifetime, it isn’t like wading a stream or crossing a field!» He wept and wept but there was nothing for it: he had to marry the frog. All three couples were wed together according to the custom?the frog being held aloft on a platter.

Some time passed. One day the king wished to see which bride was the best needle-woman. So he ordered them to make him a shirt. Poor Prince Ivan was again downcast and cried: «How can my frog sew? I’ll be a laughing stock.» The frog only jumped across the floor croaking. But no sooner was Prince Ivan asleep than she went outside, cast off her skin and turned into a beautiful maiden, calling. «Maids and matrons, sew me a shirt!» The maids and matrons straightway brought a finely-embroidered shirt: she took it, folded it and placed it alongside Prince Ivan.

There upon she turned back into a frog as if nothing had happened. In the morning Prince Ivan awoke and was overjoyed to find the shirt which he took forthwith to the king. The king gazed at it and said: «Now there’s a shirt for you, fit to wear on holy days!» Then the middle brother brought a shirt, at which the king said, «This shirt is fit only for the bath-house!» And taking the eldest brother’s shirt, he said, «And this one is fit only for a smoky peasant hut!» The king’s sons went their separate ways, with the two eldest muttering among themselves, «We were surely wrong to mock at Prince Ivan’s wife; she must be a cunning sorceress, not a frog.»

Presently the king again issued a command: this time the daughters-in-law were each to bake a loaf of bread, and bring it to him to judge which bride was the best cook. The other two brides had made fun of the frog, but now they sent a chamber- maid to see how she would bake her loaf. The frog noticed the woman, so she kneaded some dough, rolled it out, made a hole in the stove and tipped the dough straight into the fire. The chambermaid ran to tell her mistresses, the royal brides, and they proceeded to do the same. But the crafty frog had tricked them; as soon as .the woman had gone, she retrieved the dough, cleaned and mended the stove as if nothing had happened, then went out on to the porch, cast off her skin and called, «Maids and matrons, bake me a loaf of bread such as my dear father used to eat on Sundays and holidays.» In an instant the maids and matrons brought the bread. She took it, placed it beside Prince Ivan, and turned into a frog again. In the morning Prince Ivan awoke, took the loaf of bread and gave it to his father. His father was receiving the loaves brought by the elder brothers: their wives had dropped the dough into the fire just as the frog had done, so their bread was black and lumpy. First the king took the eldest son’s loaf, inspected it and despatched it to the kitchen.

then he took the middle son’s loaf and despatched it thither too. Then came Prince Ivan’s turn: he presented his loaf to his father who looked at it and said, «Now this is bread fit to grace a holy day. It is not at all like the burnt offerings of my elder daughters-in-law!»

After that the king thought to hold a ball to see which of his sons’ wives was the best dancer. AU the guests and daughters-in-law assembled; everyone was there except Prince Ivan, who thought: «How can I go to the ball with a frog?» And the poor prince began- to weep bitterly. «Do not cry, Prince Ivan,» said the frog. «Go to the ball. I shall follow in an hour.» Prince Ivan was somewhat cheered at the frog’s words, and left for the ball. Then the frog cast off her skin and turned into a lovely maid dressed in finery. When she arrived at the ball, Prince Ivan was overjoyed, and the guests clapped their hands at the sight of such beauty. They began to eat and drink. But the frog-princess would eat and slip the bones into her sleeve, then drink and pour the dregs into her other sleeve. The elder brothers’ wives saw this and followed suit, slipping bones into one sleeve and dregs into the other. When the time came for dancing, the king called upon his elder sons’ wives but they insisted on the frog-princess dancing first. And she straightway took Prince Ivan’s arm and came forward to dance. She danced and danced, whirling round and round, to the delight of all. When she shook her right sleeve, woods and lakes appeared; when she shook her left sleeve, all kinds of birds flew about. The guests were filled with wonder. When she finished dancing, everything disappeared. Then the wives of the two elder sons began to dance. They wished to do as the frog-princess had done, so they shook their right sleeves and bones flew out hitting folk about them; and when they shook their left sleeves, water splashed all over the onlookers. The king was most displeased and soon called an end to the dancing.

The ball was over. Prince Ivan rode off ahead of his wife, found the frogskin and burnt it. So when his wife returned and looked for the skin, it was nowhere to be seen. She lay down to sleep with Prince Ivan, but just before daybreak she said to him, «Oh, Prince Ivan, if only you had waited a little longer I would have been yours. Now God alone knows when we shall meet again. Farewell. If you wish to find me you must go beyond the Thrice-Nine Land to the Thrice-Ten Kingdom.» And the frog-princess vanished.

A year went by, and Prince Ivan still pined for his wife. As a second year began, he made ready to leave, seeking first the blessing of his father and mother. He rode for a long way and eventually chanced upon a little hut facing the trees, with its back to him. «Little hut, little hut,» he called. ‘Turn your face to me, please, and your back to the trees.» The little hut did as he said and Prince Ivan entered. There before him sat an old woman, who cried, «Fie, Foh! There was neither sight nor sound of Russian bones, yet now they come marching in of their own free will! Whither go you, Prince Ivan?» «First give me food and drink and put me to bed, old woman, then ask your questions.» So the old woman gave food and drink and put him to bed. Then Prince Ivan said to her, «Grannie, I have set out to rescue Yelena the Fair.» «Oh, my child,» the old woman said, «you’ve waited too long! At first she spoke of you often, but now she no longer remembers you. I haven’t seen her for a long time. Go now to my middle sister, she knows more than me.»

In the morning Prince Ivan set out, came to another little hut, and cried, «Little hut, little hut, turn your face to me, please, and your back to the trees.» The little hut did as he said and Prince Ivan entered. There before him sat an old woman, who cried, «Fie, Foh! There was neither sight nor sound of Russian bones, yet now they come marching in of their own free will! Whither go you. Prince Ivan?» «I seek Yelena the Fair, Grannie-,» he replied. «Oh, Prince Ivan,» the old woman said, «you’ve waited too long! She has begun to forget you and is to marry another. She is now living with my eldest sister; go there now, but beware: as you approach they will know it is you. Yelena will turn into a spindle, her dress will turn to gold. My sister will wind the gold thread around the spindle and put it into a box which she will lock. But you must find the key, open the box, break the spindle, toss the top over your shoulder and the bottom before you. Then she will appear.»

Off went Prince Ivan, came to the old woman’s hut, entered and saw her wind- ing gold thread around a spindle; she then locked it in a box and hid the key. But Prince Ivan quickly found the key, opened the box, took out the spindle, broke it as he had been told, tossed the top over his shoulder and the bottom before him. All of a sudden, there was Yelena the Fair standing in front of him. «Oh, Prince Ivan,» she sighed, «how long you were in coming! I almost wed another.» And she told him that the other bridegroom would soon arrive. But, taking a magic carpet from the old woman, Yelena the Fair sat upon it and they soared up and away like birds. The bridegroom set off quickly in pursuit. He was clever and guessed that they had fled. He was within ten feet of them when they flew on the carpet into Rus. Just in time! He could not follow them there, so he turned back. But Prince Ivan and Yelena the Fair flew home to the rejoicing of all; and lived happily ever after. [/spoiler] [spoiler title=’Teremok (Little Hut) (Теремок)’ style=’default’ collapse_link=’true’]

Once upon a time, a little fly built a tower in the forest. A flea jumped by, saw the tower and knocked on the door:
«Who is it that lives in this nice tall tower?»
«I, the little fly, and who are you?»
«I am the buzzing mosquito. Come live with me!» And a little field mouse ran by and knocked on the door, «Who is it that lives in this nice tall tower?»
«I, the little fly.»
«I, the buzzing mosquito, and who are you?»
«I am the little field mouse.»
«Come live with us!» And a croaking frog hopped by and knocked on the door, «Who is it that lives in this nice tall tower?»
«I, the little fly.»
«I, the buzzing mosquito.»
«And I, the little field mouse, and who are you?»
«I am a croaking frog.»
«Come live with us!» And a nervous rabbit bounced by and knocked on the door, «Who is it that lives in this nice tall tower?»
«I, the little fly.»
«I, the buzzing mosquito.»
«I, the little field mouse.»
«And I, the croaking frog, and who are you?»
«I am a nervous rabbit.»
«Come live with us!» And a sly fox ran by and knocked on the door, «Who is it that lives in this nice tall tower?»
«I, the little fly.»
«I, the buzzing mosquito.»
«I, the little field mouse.»
«I, the croaking frog.»
«And I, the nervous rabbit, and who are you?»
«I am a sly fox.»
«Come live with us!» And a gray wolf came by and knocked on the door, «Who is it that lives in this nice tall tower?»
«I, the little fly.»
«I, the buzzing mosquito.»
«I, the little field mouse.»
«I, the croaking frog.»
«I, the running rabbit.»
«I, the sly fox, and who are you?»
«I am a gray wolf.»
«Come live with us!» So they lived happily in the little tower.
Then a big bear came by and roared, «Who is it that lives in this nice tall tower?»
«I, the little fly.»
«I, the buzzing mosquito.»
«I, the little field mouse.»
«I, the croaking frog.»
«I, the running rabbit.»
«I, the sly fox.»
«I, the gray wolf, and who are you?»
«I am the big bear.»
«Well, come on in!»
The bear tried to climb into the tower, but no matter how he tried, he just didn’t fit.
«I think it would be better if I lived on the roof.»
«You will squash us all!»
«No, I won’t!» The bear sat down on the roof, and smashed the little tower. All of the other animals managed to jump out of the tower, and went back to the forest to live. [/spoiler] [spoiler title=’The little round bun  (Колобок)’ style=’default’ collapse_link=’true’]

Once upon a time there lived an old man and an old woman who were very poor and had nothing at all to their name. And they kept getting poorer and poorer till there was nothing left to eat in the house, not even bread, Said the old man:

«Do bake us a bun, old woman! If you scrape out the flour-box and sweep out the bin, you’ll have enough flour.»

So the old woman scraped out the flour-box and swept out the bin, she made some dough and she shaped a little round bun out of it. She then lit the oven, baked the bun and put it on the window sill to cool. But the bun jumped out of the window and onto the bench outside, and from the bench onto the ground, and away it rolled along the road!

On and on’ it rolled, and it met a Rabbit coming toward it.

«I’m going to eat you up, Little Round Bun!» called the Rabbit.

«Don’t do that, Fleet-Feet, let me sing you a song instead,» said Little Round Bun.

«All right, let’s hear it!»
«Here it is!

«I was scraped from the flour-box
And swept from the bin
And baked in the oven
And cooled on the sill.
I ran away from Grandpa,
I ran away from Grandma,
And I’ll run away from you, this minute I will!»

And off it rolled and away. By and by it met a Wolf coming toward it.

«I’m going to eat you up, Little Round Bun!» called the Wolf.

«Don’t do that, Brother Wolf, let me sing you a song instead.»

«All right, let’s hear it!»

«I was scraped from the flour-box
And swept from the bin
And baked in the oven
And cooled on the sill.
I ran away from Grandpa,
I ran away from Grandma,
And I’ll run away from you, this minute I will!»

And away it rolled.

By and by it met a Bear coming toward it.

«I’m going to eat you up, Little Round Bun!» called the Bear.

«Don’t do that, Brother Bear, I’ll sing you a song instead!»
«All right, let’s hear it!»

«I was scraped from the flour-box
And swept from the bin
And baked in the oven
And cooled on the sill.
I ran away from Grandpa,
I ran away from Grandma,
And I’ll run away from you, this minute I will!»

And away it rolled and away!

By and by it met a Fox coming toward it.

«I’m going to eat you up, Little Round Bun!» called the Fox.

«Don’t do that, Sister fox, I’ll sing you a song instead.»

«All right, let’s hear it!»

«I was scraped from the flour-box
And swept from the bin
And baked in the oven
And cooled on the sill.
I ran away from Grandpa,
I ran away from Grandma,
And I’ll run away from you, this minute I will!»

«Sing some more, please, don’t stop!» the Fox said. «Hop onto my tongue, I can hear you better.»

Little Round Bun jumped onto the Fox’s tongue and began to sing:

«I was scraped from the flour-box
And swept from the bin-«

But before it could go on, the Fox opened her mouth and — snap! -she gobbled it up. [/spoiler] [spoiler title=’Turnip (Репка)’ style=’default’ collapse_link=’true’]

An old man planted a turnip. The turnip grew to be enormous. The old man started to pull the turnip out of the ground. He pulled and pulled, but couldn’t pull it out. So he called the old woman over.

The old woman took hold of the old man, the old man took hold of the turnip, they pulled and pulled, but couldn’t pull it out. So the old woman called the granddaughter over.

The granddaughter took hold of the old woman, the old woman took hold of the old man, the old man took hold of the turnip, they pulled and pulled, but couldn’t pull it out. So the granddaughter called the dog over.

The dog took hold of the granddaughter, the granddaughter took hold of the old woman, the old woman took hold of the old man, the old man took hold of the turnip, they pulled and pulled, but couldn’t pull it out. So the dog called the cat over.

The cat took hold of the dog, the dog took hold of the granddaughter, the granddaughter took hold of the old woman, the old woman took hold of the old man, the old man took hold of the turnip, they pulled and pulled, but couldn’t pull it out. So the cat called the mouse over.

The mouse took hold of the cat, the cat took hold of the dog, the dog took hold of the granddaughter, the granddaughter took hold of the old woman, the old woman took hold of the old man, the old man took hold of the turnip, they pulled and pulled—and finally pulled out the turnip!

In Russian, the name «Zhuckha» is used in place of «dog.» Also, the translation loses all the the lyricism of this little tale. In Russian, the similar words repeated patterns combined to make a rhythm that is almost a tongue-twister! Transliterated, the last line of the tale sounds like this:

Myshka za koshku, koshka za Zhuchku, Zhuchka za vnuchku, vnuchka za babku, babka za dedku, dedka za repku, tyanut-potyanut-vytyanuli repku!

[/spoiler]